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Defense Production Act: Government Contractor Cheat Sheet

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On March 18, 2020, by Executive Order (“E.O.”), President Trump invoked the Defense Production Act of 1950 (“DPA”). The E.O. delegates DPA authority to the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services with respect to “all health and medical resources needed to respond to the spread of COVID-19 within the United States.” This means that the performance of rated contracts and orders (i.e., certain contracts and orders in support of programs covered by the DPA, as explained below) must be prioritized over competing commercial or non-rated governmental obligations—even if doing so could result in a breach of other obligations.

Set forth below is a checklist for contractors that have received (or believe they may receive) a rated order from a federal government agency:

1. Memorialize Standard Operating Procedures (“SOP”)

Effectively managing rated orders requires careful attention, particularly given the operational disruptions from coronavirus COVID-19. A company should consider establishing (or updating) SOPs for rated orders covering the following:

  • Designating a Point of Contact (“POC”) Responsible for Rated Orders. Publicize the POC within the company so that management and employees (e.g., C-Suite, Sales, and Marketing) who do not normally handle government contracting matters know who to contact.
  • Establish a Process to Communicate with Subcontractors. A prime contractor in receipt of a rated order stands in the shoes of the federal government and is required to notify applicable subcontractors of compliance with the rated order. Consider notifying subcontractors of the possibility of receiving a rated order and provide background on the DPA so they are not caught by surprise.
  • Establish a Commercial Customer Communications Plan. Because a rated order can delay or interfere with performance of commercial contracts, consider keeping commercial customers aware of potential impacts in the event that the government issues a rated order.
  • Frequent Communication with Contracting Officers. If the company believes it might receive a rated order, establish clear lines of communication with your Contracting Officers. Provide or re-confirm contact information for the company’s POC for rated orders.

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